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Your Scuba Gear

Danangscuba_Mask

A mask is one of the most important, and personal, pieces of scuba diving equipment you own because it lets you explore with your eyes. More...

Danangscuba_Snorkel

A snorkel is a very personal piece of equipment. It lives with your mask, spends time in your mouth, and lets you breathe while you look below, until you’re ready to submerge on scuba. More...

Danangscuba_Fins

There are fins for swimming, snorkeling, free diving and body surfing. More...

Danangscuba_BCD

Imagine scuba diving while hovering, weightless underwater – eye to eye with a fish. How is it possible? It starts with your buoyancy control device (BCD). More...

Danangscuba_Weight_System

Most people float, which is great if you like to stay at the surface. However, scuba divers want to descend and need a weight system to help them offset this tendency to float. More...

Danangscuba_REGULATOR

If you think about it, breathing underwater is pretty remarkable, and it all happens because of the regulator. The scuba regulator is a great invention that delivers the air from your scuba tank to you just the way you need it to breathe. More...

Danangscuba_SPG

Your SPG displays how much air remains in your tank so that you can end your dive well before you get too low. More...

Danangscuba_divecomputer

You can track your dives using dive tables, a depth gauge and dive watch, but most scuba divers use a dive computer – it’s easier. More...

Danangscuba_Dive_Watch

In the 1970s and 1980s, divers wore dive watches because it was the standard way to track bottom time while scuba diving. More...

Danangscuab_Dive_Knife

A dive knife is a general tool that scuba divers occasionally use to cut entangling fishing line or rap on their tanks to get a buddy’s attention. More...

Danangscuba_Lights

It’s obvious that a dive light is necessary to scuba dive at night to help you navigate, see your gauges, and observe interesting aquatic life. More...

Danangscuba_Bag

Whether you’re driving to your local dive site or getting on a plane headed for the tropics, a sturdy gear bag will help you organize, protect and carry your scuba diving equipment. More...

Danangscuba_Suits (1)

It’s called exposure protection because while scuba diving you’re not only exposed to water’s cooling ability but also to things that can scrape, cut or sting. More...

Scubadanang_Photography

With the rise of digital photography capabilities, there are now numerous options for capturing images underwater. More...

Danangscuba_accessories

An accessory is defined as an item that can be added to something else to in order to make it more useful, versatile, or attractive. More...

Danangscuba_Float

A dive flag indicates that scuba divers are nearby. In some areas, flying a dive flag while scuba diving is required by law, but in general it’s a good idea for safety reasons. More...

Danangscuba_Signaling

In the unlikely event that you’re at the surface and need to get the attention of someone on shore or on a boat, you’ll be glad you have a surface signaling device. More...

Danangscuba_Tanks

High-pressure cylinders are relatively small, yet very strong containers that hold large volumes of compressed gas. More...

Danang_Sidemount_Gear

Scuba diving with a sidemount configuration simply means that you carry your tanks at your sides instead of on your back. More...

Danangscuba_divecomputer

Dive Computer

You can track your dives using dive tables, a depth gauge and dive watch, but most scuba divers use a dive computer – it’s easier. A dive computer provides the real-time dive information you need to dive well.

A dive computer takes depth and time information and applies it to a decompression model to track the dissolved nitrogen in your body during a dive. Your computer continuously tells you how much dive time you safely have  remaining. Your computer combines a depth gauge, timer and sometimes a submersible pressure gauge (SPG) into a single, useful instrument. The majority of divers have a computer because it makes sense. Visit or ask Da Nang Scuba's experts to get advice about dive computers.

Standard Dive Computer Features

  • Easy-to-read display (sometimes in color) that provides the following information:
    • No stop limits
    • Depth
    • Time
    • No stop time remaining
    • Ascent rate
    • Emergency decompression
    • Previous dive information
  • Low battery warning
  • Enriched air compatible

Optional and Desirable Dive Computer Features

  • Air integrated to display how much air is in your tank. Certain models connect via a hose to your regulator. Some have a quick disconnect. Others receive air supply information from a transmitter on the regulator first stage.
  • Digital dive watch and computer in one small unit
  • Automatic or manual adjustment for altitude diving
  • Replaceable or rechargeable batteries
  • Multiple gas computers for technical diving or some tec diving computers have a CCR (Closed-Circuit Rebreather) mode.
  • Interface with your laptop/regular computer so you can download your dive data.
  • Electronic compass or built-in thermometer.
  • Self-adjusting decompression models
  • Dot matrix screens with menus that allow you to play games to pass the time at safety or decompression stops
  • Mask display that allows you to glance at critical dive information.

How to Choose Your Dive Computer

There are many dive computer choices and you can find the right one with a little help from a dive professional at Da Nang Scuba.

  1. Ask yourself – What type of diving do I do now and plan to do in the future? and What dive computer works with my current equipment, or what complete equipment package includes the type of computer I want?
  2. Look at dive computers with features that match your dive style and equipment setup. Evaluate:
    • Can you clearly read the data with your mask on?
    • Does the data display make sense to you – do you prefer numbers, or do you like graphics or charts?
    • Do you understand how to get the dive information you need?
  3. Don’t hesitate investing in a good dive computer. Get what you want now and go scuba diving – that’s the point.

Take Care of Your Dive Computer

  • Start by reading the instruction booklet. Push all the buttons and check out each function. Set a few preferences, such as time and date, metric or imperial, fresh or salt water, etc.
  • Rinse your dive computer in fresh water as soon as possible after each use. Keep it out of direct sunlight, especially the display. Protect it from being damaged or dropped. Store it in a cool, dry place.
  • Change or recharge your dive computer’s battery as described by the manufacturer.
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